A literary analysis of the journey in the novel the call of the wild

Plot summary[ edit ] The story opens with Buck, a large and powerful St. He is shipped to Seattle.

A literary analysis of the journey in the novel the call of the wild

The Call of the Wild is one of the most widely translated and published books by an American writer, and a proper, comprehensive bibliography of The Call of the Wild would require a tremendous international research effort; the following essay is offered in the absence of such a project as a temporary surrogate for the important literary-historical, critical arguments that have engaged the novel in the one hundred years since it was first published.

Frierson noted in a PMLA article that "It is well known that a heated controversy took place during the eighteen-nineties over the inclusion of fact, brutal fact, in fiction. For example, The Call of the Wild was published during a period of unprecedented American imperial expansion in the Western hemisphere; but the novel also appeared during a period of intense debate over the influence of French literary Naturalism on English and American fiction.

Both the geo-political situation of the United States in and the literary-critical debates of the era might provide fruitful points of departure; they might even cross paths at several points. But the beginnings of any genealogy are necessarily turbulent and difficult, and we must restrict ourselves in the present introduction to the contentious literary-critical debates that have engaged The Call of the Wild with the understanding that they offer a point of departure for other more detailed inquiries into the novel and its historical milieu.

The third reason stems from the fact that Frierson was a scholar of British Literature and his article places the debate over literary Naturalism in an international context; the article is a fine example of a careful engagement with scholarly traditions of other nations and how those have approached Jack London and the debates that are important to any understanding of his writings.

The student with a reading knowledge of foreign languages should study the numerous scholarly works available in other languages and literary traditions. This was perhaps due to the fact that the novel had been serialized by The Saturday Evening Post and had therefore been read by reviewers prior to its publication in book form.

The student of the book would do well to consult these early reviews of the novel as they provide both a portrait of the period and microcosms of later trends in the study of the book.

Character Analysis Examples in The Call of the Wild: Following the battle with Spitz, he climbs to the head of all the dogs.
SparkNotes: The Call of the Wild: Buck It seems to be the best of all possible worlds, for Buck is the most prized animal that the Judge owns.
Character Analysis in The Call of the Wild - Owl Eyes The Indispensable Struggle for Mastery The Call of the Wild is a story of transformation in which the old Buck—the civilized, moral Buck—must adjust to the harsher realities of life in the frosty North, where survival is the only imperative. Kill or be killed is the only morality among the dogs of the Klondike, as Buck realizes from the moment he steps off the boat and watches the violent death of his friend Curly.

The review in the August 2nd issue of the San Francisco Chronicle, for example, states that "His books are strong meat for the anemic generation that worships at the shrine of Henry James. Indian Summer review the rise and later dispersal of American literary culture from its historical epicenter in New England.

The early articles and reviews of the novel also included important biographical information about its author. Bland's essay inspired a biographical industry around the interpretation of London's writings that continues to the present.

These early newspaper writings are available on microfilm in some libraries. For example, Theodore C. Mitchell's introduction to the Macmillan edition discussed the economic details pertinent to "the geographical setting of the novel.

The resurgent interest in London continued through the inter-war period with a Macmillan edition of The Call of the Wild and an omnibus edition by the same publisher that included both The Call and The Scarlet Plague The Macmillan edition is of particular import; it featured an introduction by Frank L.

Mott that was published in the seven Macmillan reprints up until and which continued to appear in other subsequent editions. Mott's introduction defined London's non-canonical status in U. The biographies of this period are varied in both method and style. The first of these was a fictional biography by the popular historical novelist Irving Stone entitled Jack London, Sailor on Horseback The biographical criticism continued through other works of the inter-war period.

An Interpretive Surveywhere Leisy argued that "His reputation once established by The Call of the WildLondon poured forth with journalistic abandon tale after tale dealing with 'red-blooded' supermen, indulging in fights, and rejoicing in storms.

Kazin's narrative is grounded in a historical study of the larger cultural context in which writers such as London composed their works. The relative quiet surrounding London and The Call of the Wild continued through the early years of the Cold War as a new generation of critics worked to renew the study of London's works.

Articles on The Call of the Wild appeared at the rate of one every two years in the 's. Philip Foner's Jack London: It was a study that appeared against many of the current trends in London criticism.

Foner, a prolific scholar of American labor and social history, dedicated two pages to The Call of the Wild in the book.

A literary analysis of the journey in the novel the call of the wild

In direct contrast to Foner's under-emphasizing of the role of race in London's work, Maxwell Geismar's Rebels and Ancestors: Geismar's review of the novel is as critically unkind to the text as it is dynamic, and represents the incorporation of new ideas from the study of mythology and psychology into the interpretation of the novel.

Sherman's bibliography lists a total of 38 articles on The Call of the Wild during betweena quantity of criticism only three articles short of matching the entire critical output between and The new editions of The Call of the Wild also prompted critical revaluations of the novel.

Abraham Rothenberg interpreted London as both a "revolutionary" and a "perverse" nihilist in his introduction to the Bantam edition of the textand Mordechai Richler denounced London in "Dogs and Wolves" The Spectator July as having a "muddled ideology" but at the same time praised the novel.''The Call of the Wild'' Literary Analysis & Devices chapter of this ''The Call of the Wild'' Study Guide course is the most efficient way to study critical literary devices used in .

The Call of the Wild is a story of transformation in which the old Buck—the civilized, moral Buck—must adjust to the harsher realities of life in the frosty North, where survival is the only imperative.

Kill or be killed is the only morality among the dogs of the Klondike, as Buck realizes from the moment he steps off the boat and watches. The Call of the Wild Analysis Essays: Over , The Call of the Wild Analysis Essays, The Call of the Wild Analysis Term Papers, The Call of the Wild Analysis Research Paper, Book Reports.

ESSAYS, term and research papers available for UNLIMITED access Throughout the novel The Call of the Wild, we follow a dog named Buck . Call of the Wild study guide contains a biography of Jack London, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis.

the journey to the Klondike by ship was so dangerous that many threw supplies overboard to lighten the load. Once the ships had landed, the journey grew no easier. These papers.

Call of the Wild Questions and Answers. The Question and Answer section for Call of the Wild is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel. Character Analysis in The Call of the Wild Buck: Buck, the novel’s protagonist, is a large half-sheepdog, half–St.

A literary analysis of the journey in the novel the call of the wild

Bernard. At the beginning of the novel, he lives a comfortable life in California as a pet; by the end, he is head of a Yukon wolfpack.

SparkNotes: The Call of the Wild: Themes